God’s Will – What can resist it?

lost-sheep

(God delivers revelation through many sources.  Thanks Bryan, God’s messenger that prompted this revelation.)

First consider this premise.  Is there a limit to how far a father will go to save his child?  Is there really a point when God, who has all of eternity, will give up on one of his sons or daughters?  (Read Luke 15:4-7 – the parable of the lost sheep)  It is God’s will that none be lost.  So take heart lost souls – all is never really lost because it is God’s will that we ALL be saved.  (Note to RT:  Get that through your head!)

Next, the church is beginning to come to grips with the fact that when Christ came, He came for ALL of us no matter what our sin may be:  “I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.” – Luke 5:32  Note that there is no descriptive adjective that gives any type of qualification to the word ‘sinners’.  So, the question I need to ask follows, is not accepting Christ into your heart before you leave this earth a sin – a sin that Christ cannot call us from?  This is where I need some help in understanding if our present covenant with God has any time limitations to it.  Is physical death the ‘dead’line?  Or is there another ‘life’ (sort of like our life in utero) in which we still have the ability to repent?  (Don’t try to put a name to this other ‘life’, because it would never be anything that we could imagine.  Just like a fetus could never imagine what our life here on earth would be.)  So does our ability to repent extend beyond this world?  Then consider the parable of the workers in the field – read the whole thing from Matt 20:1-16.  Here is just the twist:

“The workers who were hired about five in the afternoon came and each received a denarius. 10 So when those came who were hired first, they expected to receive more. But each one of them also received a denarius. 11 When they received it, they began to grumble against the landowner. 12 ‘These who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the work and the heat of the day.’

13 “But he answered one of them, ‘I am not being unfair to you, friend. Didn’t you agree to work for a denarius? 14 Take your pay and go. I want to give the one who was hired last the same as I gave you. 15 Don’t I have the right to do what I want with my own money? Or are you envious because I am generous?’

That last comment is a slap in the head to us that are still focused on what we get – being envious of God’s generosity to others.  Why would we want to hold God to the same limited interpretation of what we as humans think ‘is fair’?  Especially, when it comes to His other children.  And, since He is the sole creator of the universe, His other children include sinners and non-believers of this world and any other worlds He may have created – right?  I was taught that once we begin to put limitations on our God we need to reconsider our path.  I have reconsidered it and now understand that if it is our God’s will to save each and every one of us – all of us are going to be saved no matter how long it takes.  When was the last time God did not get what He wanted?

Now the real transformation occurs when we workers that were hired at the beginning of the day realize that no matter how long we work or what we get paid, we are doing the work of God!  God’s work!  And what is God’s work?  It’s saving sinners.  How blessed are we that God should have us help in His most holy work – saving those that have not come to see…yet.  And who’s to say that this work will not continue when our days on earth come to an end?  Now there’s a thought…

Comments

  1. Bette Wheaton says:

    Thanks Robert

    1. RT says:

      I appreciate the thought – but the gratitude goes to God…best to Tom…RT